Football For All: What does football mean to you?

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Football For All: What does football mean to you?

Last Friday, FBB had the opportunity to take 30 FBB participants to the Chelsea v. Hull 5th round FA Cup tie.

We were invited by the England Football Association (FA) as part of its ‘For All’ initiative, which aims to ensure that everyone who plays football has a great experience – regardless of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, ability or disability, faith or age.

Since the start of 2018, FBB schools participants have been collaborating with the FA on this initiative, themed around how football is more than just a game. FBB is all about helping young people reach their full potential, and the ‘For All’ collaboration has been an amazing opportunity to get our young peoples’ creative juices flowing.

Different schools programmes approached the idea in different ways, but shared the same end goal – a video presentation to the FA which will be presented at Wembley in the Spring.

Participants from South London schools The Elmgreen and Chestnut Grove were put to the task, starting with group brainstorming sessions. It harnessed their creativity and prompted them to think outside of the box. Most importantly, it taught them how to effectively collaborate with others and how to be a leader in a group setting. Initially, groups struggled to come up with more than two ideas at a time. However as time went on, their confidence grew, with them becoming more comfortable with their groups and figuring out how to get the best out of everyone.

Lastly, those brainstorming sessions transitioned into media planning. Groups worked on story boarding, and prepared for the FA Cup game at Stamford Bridge, where they interviewed passers by about how football influences their lives.

At the game, students filmed short videos with fans outside the stadium, and displayed the same composure and confidence FBB is always proud to see in our participants. In doing so they learnt oracy skills, research, planning and production techniques. Underpinning all of this was an emphasis upon being socially aware and the importance of working in a team.

“It was an amazing experience for our young people who gained an opportunity to connect with real fans from all backgrounds and ages and learn what football means to them and the role it plays both in their lives and their local communities.” said Bruk, FBB Project Lead.

Through this process, it has been fantastic to witness the growth of the participants involved with the project. We look forward to presenting them to the FA at Wembley in early March.