Boys continue to dramatically underperform at school compared to girls.

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Boys continue to dramatically underperform at school compared to girls.

Boys continue to dramatically underperform at school compared to girls. And Department for Education data suggests this gap is only increasing.

report published last week showed that the gender gap in young people going to university has continued to increase and is now at 11.9%. This means that 55% of women under the age of 30 have attended university while only 43% of men have attended. UCAS data on admissions suggests this gap will only widen, with 35% more women starting university this autumn than men.
There are many pathways to success after school with university being just one amongst many progression options for young people. Despite this, we see this significant gap as a reflection of wider issues about the ways in which boys engage with learning and are supported at school. Simply put, too many boys in our education system see school as something to be endured rather than enjoyed.

At Football Beyond Borders, we work with our partner schools to address this through our FBB Curriculum which puts a young person’s passion for football at the heart of their learning. Our experiences with hundreds of disengaged boys have shown us the transformation that occurs when young people are provided with opportunities to learn through material which is relevant and engaging.
We see this as crucial to ensuring that boys don’t continue to fall further behind girls on all significant indicators of educational success and engagement.